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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/11/2017 in all areas

  1. 4 points
  2. 4 points
  3. 4 points
    Took a mulligan Mr. Earl. Another 70 degree day in Colorado, top down, lunch at A & W.
  4. 3 points
    I bought the car in January. Anyone recognize her? Needs brake work but I'm happy so far.
  5. 3 points
    Hello all. I recently bought a nice 1925 dodge sedan. I haven't done much more the. Start it and drive it off the trailer. Can I get some help from you guys on the dos and donts? I plan to mess around with it for a little while and then possibly let someone else enjoy it later on. Whats the the best way to know how to adjust the timing on the steering wheel? many thanks
  6. 3 points
    Gee, a show at a funeral home would be quite an undertaking!
  7. 2 points
    My buddy had a rear end spreader for an old dodge that worked like a charm. Didn't need to use the ole' tuba-fore method.
  8. 2 points
    Off topic here but back in '56, an appliance salesman demonstrated a Maytag washer to mom by balancing a cigarette on top of it while it was on spin cycle. My brother still has that washer and can still balance a cigarette on it. No baloney! Back to Buicks...
  9. 2 points
    I will be back in the garage tomorrow to finish the other side. I will be able to get all the dimensions then and post them.
  10. 1 point
    ’46 Buick-Super 8 model 51-4dr. Sedan $8900/obo Straight 8 cyl. Dyna Flash-valve inhead Engine No. 4697550 5 Black paint-all original condition. With service manual. Car was Marge Schott Buick vehicle with MSO for many years at dealership, used as parts/lunch running car then parked in showroom. Purchased at Marge Schott vehicle estate auction 2005. Cracked back passenger window. Last time seen running 2006. Good solid car. Style No. 46-4569 Body No. G 57738 Trim No. 52 Paint No. 4 Located in Mason, OH
  11. 1 point
    ’46 Buick-Super 8 model 51-4dr. Sedan $8900/obo Straight 8 cyl. Dyna Flash-valve inhead Engine No. 4697550 5 Black paint-all original condition. With service manual. Car was Marge Schott Buick vehicle with MSO for many years at dealership, used as parts/lunch running car then parked in showroom. Purchased at Marge Schott auction 2005. Cracked back passenger window. Last time seen running 2006. Good solid car. Style No. 46-4569 Body No. G 57738 Trim No. 52 Paint No. 4 Located in Mason, OH
  12. 1 point
    Does anyone have some good pics from a 1928 Master Six engine / engine bay? I would like to know how it looked like when the car left the factory. And/or a sketch about vacuum lines routing? Mine are routed somehow, with a modern (leaking!) plastic vacuum canister, mounted below dashboard. I have thrown the canister out of the car, but I don't think the routing from the manifold needs to be detoured below the dashboard? Except the one for the wiper of course. Or was there a vacuum canister factory installed? I have as well two lines going up to the wiper motor. One is connected through the wiper operating valve, the other one is "blind". Would appreciate to know how the system worked out of the factory. Thanks, Werner
  13. 1 point
    Painted the block tonight. I carefully covered all the block openings with blue painter's tape. It's amazing how nice it looks when everything is the same color. 2 coats??? So now I have to paint all the engine accessories to get ready for the final build. My plan going forward is to restore the master cylinder and do a complete brake job. Then replace all four chassis springs. After that, a nice coat of chassis black (POR-15). Then I'd like to install the engine back in the chassis as I feel it's a lot safer there.
  14. 1 point
    I looked on my wheels and didn't find any markings. Attached are a few pictures, which hopefully will help. The last one is the back of the side mount.
  15. 1 point
    Excellent news! Been patiently waiting for him to recover so I can get my center console leatherette, glad he's going to be back in business. Seems like a super nice guy from all correspondence I've had with him. Lucas
  16. 1 point
    And you have got to include my 'B-16's" !!!!
  17. 1 point
  18. 1 point
    Here is an engine dolly I built. I aslo ran the engine on it. Makes it easy tor roll around while the rest of the car is being done
  19. 1 point
    Wife of collector here.. yes, I am scanning websites regularly as we compile list and pics for police and revamp security. Insurance is useless - can't document details of a lifetime of collecting. Here's one pic I have handy, because it was a Christmas present from me...will upload more soon. Interesting comment from Mercer09 about it being someone "close to the fella" -- we've thought of that, but not likely just one fella - more like a crew of scumbags...
  20. 1 point
    Save yourself some grief and leave the pinion seal alone unless you disassemble to service other parts like bearings. A defective pinion seal will leak into the torque tube and will find a level below the driveshaft and will not cause problems other than a leak at the flange. A leak at the flange can be sealed with a bead of RTV. Just monitor the nature of the fluid in the torque tube with a plugged hole at the back.
  21. 1 point
    I hesitated in responding, because there are some places that this stuff can be used and some where it shouldn't be used. Git Rot (sp) is an epoxy that travels through the wood and soaks into the wood as it travels. Although it works as any epoxy resin it's slow kick time allows it the penetrate both the good wood and the rotted wood before it sets up. It does a nice job of replacing dry rotted material, but also has multiple uses when rigidity of the wood is required. Used judiciously it can be the restores best friend. I've used it several times over the last forty years on wood that I was afraid that I was going to have to replace. Repairs are still holding up today.
  22. 1 point
  23. 1 point
    Let the penetrating oil to penetrate. It make take several days with new application of oil everyday. Apply the penetrating oil into the bolt hole were the bolt head broke off. I'm sure that is good and rusted up because breaking a steel head bolt is a sure indicator of that. Second, apply the penetrating oil around the mating surface of the pump/chain cover housing. Allow this is penetrate for days. Yes, rusting steel parts can appear to be welded together. I replaced the t-belt on my KIA. KIA in it's engineering wisdom has the crank gear fitted into the balance pulley. Took a week of penetrating oil and rubber mallet to get the gear off the pulley. Needless to say the gear seats inside the pulley less than a quarter inch. Yet both parts appeared to be welded together as one solid piece. Keep in mind these two parts were assembled together only 6 years ago. Your Buick assembled decades ago. It will take time for the oil to do the trick. Key here is time for the oil to penetrate. Patience. Use light heating at the broken bolt area as the last resort.
  24. 1 point
    Even application of modest heat (i.e. propane torch) to the cover in the vicinity of the bolt may help. Just warm the area, apply some trans fluid, PB Blaster, or other and let it cool. Lather,rinse, repeat... The heat/cool cycling will help to break the corrosion bond.
  25. 1 point
    If the bolt is on an edge drill the side of the cover down to the bolt and introduce your penetrating fluid there. If that does not work tap and install a grease zerk and try to pump grease while heating.